Black Ice Snowflake Clownfish

$44.99

Amphiprion ocellaris

The Black Ice Snowflake (Amphiprion ocellaris) is a cross between a Black Ocellaris and a Snowflake. These beautiful fish were the preliminary results of our efforts to produce a Black Ocellaris with Snowflake patterns. This first generation still exhibits the yellow orange coloration of the normal Snowflake however it has intense black markings around the irregular white bars.

How We House Our Fish

All of our fish are housed in dedicated captive bred fish systems. Each of these systems is dedicated to a single breeder and used to house the captive bred fish we receive from them. Great care is taken to ensure these systems do not get cross contaminated. We only introduce new fish into these systems when receiving an order from that system's breeder.

We do this as it allows us to ensure our fish are pest free without the need for medications. However, should any pest turn up we can and will medicate these systems.

Medicating fish

Medicating fish is hard on them and diminishes their overall health. While medicating is a good precaution to take with all wild fish, captive bred fish from a trusted breeder can forgo medications and ultimately will be much healthier because of it.

That being said, when exposed to a tank where pests are already present, likely from an unmedicated wild fish being in the tank, these captive bred fish are by no means immune and can be infected. So it's important that all wild fish introduced to your system go through a proper quarantine.

Observation and Inspection

Upon arrival all of our fish go through an observation period of one to two weeks, depending on how long their journey to our facility was. During the observation period, the fish are inspected to ensure they are eating, aren't showing any visible signs of stress or pests, and otherwise look healthy. If they pass our inspection, they will be made available on our website.

What Clownfish Can I Pair?

When trying to create a pair of clownfish it's best to stick to two clownfish of the same species such as two A. ocellaris or two A. percula. The strain of clownfish doesn't matter. Pairing a Snow Storm with a Darwin would be okay as they are the same species. However, pairing a Snow Storm with a Skunk Clown is likely to lead to a lot of fighting as they are different species. 

While you can find examples of pairs between two different species and hybrids as the result of these pairings, these are the exception not the rule. Our recommendation is to avoid trying this unless you are an experienced reefer looking for a challenge.

How Many Clownfish?

This also depends on the species, Skunk Clowns and Spotcinctus do well in groups of any size. For A. ocellaris and A. percula we recommend keeping it to two as they tend to pick on the smallest clown in groups any larger. You can also have success keeping these species in large harems of twelve clowns or more. This is because the aggression is spread out among all the fish and doesn't lead to focused bullying of one individual. Attempting to keep a large group of clowns is something only recommended for experienced reefers.

Do I Need A Male And A Female?

Clownfish are known as sequential hermaphrodites, in short this means that all clownfish are born as sexually immature males. When they reach the age of 1.5-2 years of age, the most dominate and largest clownfish of the harem transitions into a sexually mature female. The second most dominate becomes the sexually mature male. All other clownfish in the harem remain sexually immature males until there is a shift in the dominance hierarchy. If the female clownfish is removed from the group, such as by death, the largest and most dominant male becomes a female. The remaining males move up a rank in the hierarchy.

This is why clownfish are known for being so aggressive. All clownfish in the harem are constantly fighting to maintain their position in this dominance hierarchy.

All of the clownfish we sell are immature males, none are old enough to have reached sexual maturity. A pair of young male clownfish will become a sexually mature male and female in time. If you currently have only one clownfish regardless of it being male or female, you will have the best chance of creating a new pair successfully by adding a sexually immature male.

 

Anemone Hosting

The symbiotic relationship between clownfish and anemones is perhaps one of the most iconic relationships between any two animals. This relationship is often the reason why many people enter the marine aquarium hobby.

While anemones are most well known for hosting clownfish, they will also host many inverts as well! There are various species of shrimp and crabs that can be found living in the protective stinging tentacles of an anemone. However, it's important to understand that some anemones do not naturally host anything, and the different species of clownfish, shrimp, and crabs that use anemones for protection have preferences for which anemones they will use.

Listed below are examples of anemones you will find these animals using as a host for protection in aquariums and in the wild. Despite these general guidelines it's important to understand that many of these fish and inverts can choose pretty much anything in the aquarium to be hosted by.

Providing your clownfish an ideal host anemone will increase the chances of the anemone hosting your clownfish but not guarantee it. Often hosting can take time and your clownfish may ultimately choose a coral instead.

Can Anemones Be Shared?

We're often asked if you can add an amenone invert such as a Porcelain Crab to an anemone that's already hosting a clownfish. This can depend on the size of the anemone and the temperament of the clownfish. We've seen a pair of clownfish gladly sharing a small Bubble Tip Anemone with a few Sexy Shrimp and we've also seen a single clownfish making sure that no inverts could get anywhere near its Giant Carpet Anemone.

Our recommendation is to make sure you have enough anemones present for every fish or invert that requires one. You may find they will end up sharing but it's most likely that they will not.

Anemone Fish

Ocellaris Clownfish
Amphiprion ocellaris

Bubble Tip Anemone
Entacmaea quadricolor

Giant Carpet Anemone
Stichodactyla gigantea

Haddon's Saddle Carpet Anemon
Stichodactyla haddoni

Merten's Carpet Anemone
Stichodactyla mertensii

Ritteri Anemone
Heteractis magnifica

Percula Clownfish
Amphiprion percula

Bubble Tip Anemone
Entacmaea quadricolor

Giant Carpet Anemone
Stichodactyla gigantea

Merten's Carpet Anemone
Stichodactyla mertensii

Ritteri Anemone
Heteractis magnifica

Sebae Anemone
Heteractis crispa

Orange Skunk Clownfish
Amphiprion sandaracinos

Merten's Carpet Anemone
Stichodactyla mertensii

Sebae Sea Anemone
Heteractis crispa

Pink Skunk Clownfish
Amphiprion perideraion

Giant Carpet Anemone
Stichodactyla gigantea

Long Tentacle Anemone
Macrodactyla doreensis

Ritteri Anemone
Heteractis magnifica

Sebae Anemone
Heteractis crispa

Spotcinctus Clownfish
Amphiprion bicinctus

Bubble Tip Anemone
Entacmaea quadricolor

Beaded Anemone
Heteractis aurora

Haddon's Saddle Carpet Anemone
Stichodactyla haddoni

Ritteri Anemone
Heteractis magnifica

Sebae Anemone
Heteractis crispa

 

Anemone Inverts

Sexy Anemone Shrimp
Thor amboinensis

Bubble Tip Anemone
Entacmaea quadricolor

Giant Carpet Anemone
Stichodactyla gigantea

Maxi-Mini Carpet Anemone
Stichodactyla tapetum

Ritteri Anemone
Heteractis magnifica

Rock Flower Anemone
Epicystis crucifer

Porcelain Anemone Crab
Neopetrolisthes ohshimai

Bubble Tip Anemone
Entacmaea quadricolor

Giant Carpet Anemone
Stichodactyla gigantea

Maxi-Mini Carpet Anemone
Stichodactyla tapetum

Ritteri Anemone
Heteractis magnifica

Rock Flower Anemone
Epicystis crucifer